Review Essay: Recent Research on Philanthropy and the Nonprofit Sector in India and South Asia

  • Mark Sidel

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Copyright information

© International Society for Third-Sector Research and The Johns Hopkins University 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Sidel
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Iowa College of Law and Obermann Center for Advanced StudiesIowa City

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