Human Ecology

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 219–239

Post-Boom Logging in Amazonia

  • Miguel Pinedo-Vasquez
  • Daniel J. Zarin
  • Kevin Coffey
  • Christine Padoch
  • Fernando Rabelo
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1011064031078

Cite this article as:
Pinedo-Vasquez, M., Zarin, D.J., Coffey, K. et al. Human Ecology (2001) 29: 219. doi:10.1023/A:1011064031078

Abstract

Recent analyses of timber exploitation in Amazonia conclude that a variety of socioeconomic and ecological factors in the region make a stable and profitable logging industry virtually impossible. Most of these studies focus on large-scale timber industries and their dependence on over-exploitation of a small number of high-value timbers. In this article we discuss the economic, ecological, and social aspects of Amazonian logging in a region where the timber industry appeared to have collapsed after stocks of high-value timber were exhausted. We show that forestry in a post-boom phase, currently found in many areas of Amazonia, differs from the better-described “boom” period in its scale of operations, in the range of timbers cut, in management practices employed, and in the costs and benefits of production. Results of a seven-year study show that when sawtimber, poles and firewood are produced in a management system that combines forestry and agriculture they can provide significant additional income for Amazonian smallholders.

Forestry Amazonia smallholders Brazil 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miguel Pinedo-Vasquez
    • 1
  • Daniel J. Zarin
    • 2
  • Kevin Coffey
    • 3
  • Christine Padoch
    • 3
  • Fernando Rabelo
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Environmental Research and Conservation—CERCColumbia UniversityNew York
  2. 2.School of Forest Resources and ConservationUniversity of FloridaGainesville
  3. 3.Institute of Economic BotanyNew York Botanical GardenBronx
  4. 4.Instituto de Pesquisa Ambiental da AmazôniaBelémBrazil

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