Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 31, Issue 2, pp 153–163 | Cite as

Prevalence of Autism in Iceland

  • Páll Magnússon
  • Evald Saemundsen
Article

Abstract

This clinic-based study estimated the prevalence of autism in Iceland in two consecutive birth cohorts, subjects born in 1974-1983 and in 1984-1993. In the older cohort classification was based on the ICD-9 in 72% of cases while in the younger cohort 89% of cases were classified according to the ICD-10. Estimated prevalence rates for Infantile autism/Childhood autism were 3.8 per 10,000 in the older cohort and 8.6 per 10,000 in the younger cohort. The characteristics of the autistic groups are presented in terms of level of intelligence, male:female ratio, and age at diagnosis. For the younger cohort scores on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale are reported as well. Results are compared with a previous Icelandic study and recent population-based studies in other countries based on the ICD-10 classification system. Methodological issues are discussed as well as implications for future research and service delivery.

Autism prevalence epidemiology Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised Childhood Autism Rating Scale 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Páll Magnússon
    • 1
  • Evald Saemundsen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryNational University HospitalIceland
  2. 2.State Diagnostic and Counseling CenterKópavogurIceland

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