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International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 549–577 | Cite as

Activity and Ranging Patterns of Guerezas in the Kakamega Forest: Intergroup Variation and Implications for Intragroup Feeding Competition

  • Peter J. Fashing
Article

Abstract

From March 1997 to February 1998, I investigated the activity patterns of 2 groups and the ranging patterns of 5 groups of eastern black-and-white colobus (Colobus guereza), aka guerezas, in the Kakamega Forest, Kenya. Guerezas at Kakamega spent more of their time resting than any other population of colobine monkeys studied to date. In addition, I recorded not one instance of intragroup aggression in 16,710 activity scan samples, providing preliminary evidence that intragroup contest competition may be rare or absent among guerezas at Kakamega. Mean daily path lengths ranged from 450 to 734 m, and home range area ranged from 12 to 20 ha, though home range area may have been underestimated for several of the study groups. Home range overlap was extensive with 49–83% of each group's range overlapped by the ranges of other groups. Despite the high level of home range overlap, the frequently entered areas (quadrats entered on ≥30% of a group's total study days) of any one group were not frequently entered by any other study group. Mean daily path length is not significantly correlated with levels of availability or consumption of any plant part item. Mean daily path length is also not significantly correlated with group size, though the largest group did have the longest mean daily path length. This finding suggests that intragroup scramble competition may have been rare or absent among guerezas at Kakamega except perhaps in the largest group, which was unusually large.

Colobus guereza daily path length home range aggression feeding competition 

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© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyColumbia UniversityNew York
  2. 2.New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology (NYCEP)USA

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