Biogeochemistry

, Volume 53, Issue 3, pp 249–267

The carbon content characteristics of tropical peats in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia: Estimating their spatial variability in density

  • Sawahiko Shimada
  • Hidenori Takahashi
  • Akira Haraguchi
  • Masami Kaneko
Article

Abstract

Clarification of carbon content characteristics, on their spatial variability in density, of tropical peatlands is needed for more accurate estimates of the C pools and more detailed C cycle understandings. In this study, the C density characteristics of different peatland types and at various depths within tropical peats in Central Kalimantan were analyzed. The peatland types and the land cover types were classified by land system map and remotely sensed data of multi-temporal AVHRR composites (1-km pixel size), respectively. Differences in the mean values of volumetric C density (CDV) were found among peatland types owing to the variability in physical consolidation from peat decomposition or nutrient inputs, although no vertical trends of CDV were found. Using a step-wise regression technique, geographic variables and the categories of peatland type and land cover type were found to explain 54% of the variability of CDV within tropical peatlands in some conditions.

AVHRR Central Kalimantan multiple regression peatland types tropical peatland volumetric carbon density 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sawahiko Shimada
    • 1
  • Hidenori Takahashi
    • 2
  • Akira Haraguchi
    • 3
  • Masami Kaneko
    • 4
  1. 1.Graduate School of Environmental Earth ScienceHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan (Author for correspondence, e-mail
  2. 2.Graduate School of Environmental Earth ScienceHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of ScienceNiigata UniversityNiigataJapan
  4. 4.Hokkaido Institute of Environmental SciencesSapporoJapan

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