Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 29, Issue 5, pp 433–444 | Cite as

Test-Retest Reliability of the Spanish Version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-IV)

  • Milagros Bravo
  • Julio Ribera
  • Maritza Rubio-Stipec
  • Glorisa Canino
  • Patrick Shrout
  • Rafael Ramírez
  • Lizbeth Fábregas
  • Ligia Chavez
  • Margarita Alegría
  • José J. Bauermeister
  • Alfonso Martínez Taboas
Article

Abstract

The test-retest reliability of the Spanish Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-IV) is presented. This version was developed in Puerto Rico in consultation with an international bilingual committee, sponsored by NIMH. The sample (N = 146) consisted of children recruited from outpatient mental health clinics and a drug residential treatment facility. Two different pairs of nonclinicians administered the DISC twice to the parent and child respondents. Results indicated fair to moderate agreement for parent reports on most diagnoses. Relatively similar agreement levels were observed for last month and last year time frames. Surprisingly, the inclusion of impairment as a criterion for diagnosis did not substantially change the pattern of results for specific disorders. Parents were more reliable when reporting on diagnoses of younger (4–10) than older children. Children 11–17 years old were reliable informants on disruptive and substance abuse/dependence disorders, but unreliable for anxiety and depressive disorders. Hence, parents were more reliable when reporting about anxiety and depressive disorders whereas children were more reliable than their parents when reporting about disruptive and substance disorders.

reliability Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC)s psychometrics Spanish language diagnostic instrument methodological study 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milagros Bravo
    • 1
  • Julio Ribera
    • 2
    • 3
  • Maritza Rubio-Stipec
    • 4
  • Glorisa Canino
    • 5
  • Patrick Shrout
    • 6
  • Rafael Ramírez
    • 2
  • Lizbeth Fábregas
    • 2
  • Ligia Chavez
    • 2
  • Margarita Alegría
    • 7
  • José J. Bauermeister
    • 8
  • Alfonso Martínez Taboas
    • 1
  1. 1.Behavioral Sciences Research Institute and Department of Graduate Studies in EducationUniversity of Puerto RicoSan JuanPuerto Rico
  2. 2.Behavioral Sciences Research InstituteUniversity of Puerto RicoSan JuanPuerto Rico
  3. 3.VA Medical CenterSan JuanPuerto Rico
  4. 4.Behavioral Sciences Research Institute and Department of EconomicsUniversity of Puerto RicoSan JuanPuerto Rico
  5. 5.Behavioral Sciences Research Institute and Department of PediatricsUniversity of Puerto RicoSan JuanPuerto Rico
  6. 6.Department of PsychologyNew York UniversityNew York
  7. 7.Behavioral Sciences Research Institute and Graduate School of Public HealthUniversity of Puerto RicoSan JuanPuerto Rico
  8. 8.Behavioral Sciences Research Institute and Department of PsychologyUniversity of Puerto RicoSan JuanPuerto Rico

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