Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 23, Issue 9, pp 667–675

An evaluation of the anti-bacterial action of ceramic powder slurries using multi-parameter flow cytometry

  • Christopher J. Hewitt
  • Sanjay R. Bellara
  • Andrea Andreani
  • Gerhard Nebe-von-Caron
  • Caroline M. McFarlane
Article

Abstract

Multi-parameter flow cytometric techniques have been used to study the effects of three ceramic powders CaO, MgO and ZnO on the physiology of individual, exponentially growing E. coli cells. Whilst all three powders inhibited reproductive growth, depending on their concentration, the mechanism of action of CaO and MgO was different to that of ZnO as shown by fluorescent staining techniques developed in our laboratory.

ceramic powder slurries Escherichia coli membrane integrity membrane potential multi-parameter flow cytometry 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher J. Hewitt
    • 1
  • Sanjay R. Bellara
    • 1
  • Andrea Andreani
    • 1
  • Gerhard Nebe-von-Caron
    • 2
  • Caroline M. McFarlane
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Bioprocess Engineering, School of Chemical EngineeringThe University of BirminghamEdgbastonUK
  2. 2.Unilever Research, Colworth LaboratorySharnbrookUK

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