Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 29, Issue 3, pp 241–254 | Cite as

The Hopelessness Theory of Depression: A Test of the Diathesis–Stress and Causal Mediation Components in Third and Seventh Grade Children

  • John R. Z. Abela
Article

Abstract

The goal of the current study was to test the diathesis–stress and causal mediation components of the hopelessness theory of depression in third- and seventh-grade children. The procedure involved an initial assessment of depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and the 3 cognitive styles posited as vulnerability factors by hopelessness theory. The procedure also involved a series of 6 weekly follow-up assessments in which depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and the occurrence of negative events were assessed. A depressogenic attributional style interacted with negative events to predict increases in depressive symptoms in seventh-grade children but not in third-grade children. A depressogenic inferential style about consequences interacted with negative events to predict increases in depressive symptoms in both third- and seventh-grade children. Last, a depressogenic inferential style about the self interacted with negative events to predict increases in depressive symptoms in third- and seventh-grade girls but not boys. None of these interactions were mediated by hopelessness.

hopelessness theory of depression developmental psychopathology diathesis–stress theory children 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Z. Abela
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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