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A Roadmap of Agent Research and Development

  • Nicholas R. Jennings
  • Katia Sycara
  • Michael Wooldridge
Article

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of research and development activities in the field of autonomous agents and multi-agent systems. It aims to identify key concepts and applications, and to indicate how they relate to one-another. Some historical context to the field of agent-based computing is given, and contemporary research directions are presented. Finally, a range of open issues and future challenges are highlighted.

autonomous agents multi-agent systems history 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas R. Jennings
    • 1
  • Katia Sycara
    • 2
  • Michael Wooldridge
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electronic EngineeringQueen Mary and Westfield CollegeLondonUK
  2. 2.School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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