Ethics and Information Technology

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 257–263 | Cite as

Using genetic information while protecting the privacy of the soul

  • James H. Moor

Abstract

Computing plays an important role in genetics (and vice versa).Theoretically, computing provides a conceptual model for thefunction and malfunction of our genetic machinery. Practically,contemporary computers and robots equipped with advancedalgorithms make the revelation of the complete human genomeimminent – computers are about to reveal our genetic soulsfor the first time. Ethically, computers help protect privacyby restricting access in sophisticated ways to genetic information.But the inexorable fact that computers will increasingly collect,analyze, and disseminate abundant amounts of genetic informationmade available through the genetic revolution, not to mentionthat inexpensive computing devices will make genetic informationgathering easier, underscores the need for strong and immediateprivacy legislation.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Griswold v. Connecticut, 381 U.S. 479, 1965.Google Scholar
  2. Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113, 1973.Google Scholar
  3. G. F. George. A Brief History of the Human Genome Project. In B. Gert, E. M. Berger, J. George F. Cahill, K. D. Clouser, C. M. Culver, J. B. Moeschler and G. H. S. Singer, editors, Morality and the New Genetics. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Sudbury, Massachusetts, 1996.Google Scholar
  4. C. Culver, J. Moor, W. Duerfeldt, M. Kapp, and M. Sullivan. Privacy. Professional Ethics, 3 (3 & 4): 3–25, 1994.Google Scholar
  5. J. Wagner DeCew. In Pursuit of Privacy. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 1997.Google Scholar
  6. C. Fried. Privacy. In F. D. Schoeman, editor, Philosophical Dimensions of Privacy. Cambridge University Press, New York, 1984.Google Scholar
  7. B. Gert, E. M. Berger, Jr. G. F. Cahill, K. Danner Clouser, C. M. Culver, J. B. Moeschler, and G. H. S. Singer. Morality and the New Genetics. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Sudbury, Massachusetts, 1996.Google Scholar
  8. P. Kitcher. The Lives to Come. Simon & Schuster, New York, 1996.Google Scholar
  9. B. Lewin. Genes VI. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1997.Google Scholar
  10. J. H. Moor. What is Computer Ethics? Metaphilosophy, 16(4): 26–75, 1985.Google Scholar
  11. J. H. Moor. How to Invade and Protect Privacy with Computers. In C. C. Gould, editor, The Information Web. Westview Press, Boulder, 1989.Google Scholar
  12. J. H. Moor. Ethics of Privacy Protection. Library Trends, 39 (1 & 2): 69–82, 1990.Google Scholar
  13. J. H. Moor. Towards a Theory of Privacy in the Information Age. Computers & Society, 27(3): 27–32, 1997.Google Scholar
  14. J. H. Moor. Reason, Relativity, and Responsibility in Computer Ethics. Computers & Society, 28: 14–21, 1998.Google Scholar
  15. B. Moore. Privacy: Studies in Social and Cultural History. M. E. Sharpe, Inc, Armonk, New York, 1984.Google Scholar
  16. J. Rachael. Why is Privacy Important? Philosophy and Public Affairs, 4(Summer): 323–333, 1975.Google Scholar
  17. J. H. Reiman. Privacy, Intimacy, and Personhood. In F. D. Schoeman, editor, Philosophical Dimensions of Privacy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1984.Google Scholar
  18. F. D. Schoeman. Philosophical Dimensions of Privacy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1984.Google Scholar
  19. Roland Somogyi, and Carol Ann Sniegoski. Modeling the Complexity of Genetic Networks: Understanding Multigenic and Pleiotropic Regulation. Complexity, 1(6): 45–63, 1996.Google Scholar
  20. Samuel D. Warren and Louis D. Brandeis. The Right to Privacy. Harvard Law Review, IV(5), 1890.Google Scholar
  21. R. Waterson, and J.E. Sulston. The Human Genome Project: Reaching the Finish Line. Science, 282(2): 53–54, 1998.Google Scholar
  22. Chiou-Hwa, Yuh, Hamid Bolouri, and Eric Davidson. Genomic Cis-Regulatory Logic: Experimental and Computational Analysis of a Sea Urchin Gene. Science, 279(20): 1896–1902, 1998.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • James H. Moor
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA. E-mail

Personalised recommendations