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Higher-Order and Symbolic Computation

, Volume 13, Issue 1–2, pp 135–152 | Cite as

Continuations: A Mathematical Semantics for Handling Full Jumps

  • Christopher Strachey
  • Christopher P. Wadsworth
Article

Abstract

This paper describes a method of giving the mathematical semantics of programming languages which include the most general form of jumps.

Keywords

Operating System Artificial Intelligence Programming Language Mathematical Semantic Full Jump 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Strachey
    • 1
  • Christopher P. Wadsworth
  1. 1.Programming Research GroupOxford UniversityOxford

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