Journal of Educational Change

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 155–172 | Cite as

Putting Students at the Centre in Education Reform

  • Benjamin Levin

Abstract

Education reform cannot succeed and should not proceedwithout much more direct involvement of students inall its aspects. This paper develops a set ofarguments for a sustained and meaningful role forstudents in defining, shaping, managing andimplementing reform, and outlines some ways in whichsuch involvement might occur. The arguments are bothorganizational and educational in nature, as are theproposed strategies for increasing the student role inthe reform and improvement process.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin Levin
    • 1
  1. 1.Continuing Education DivisionThe University of ManitobaWinnipeg

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