Journal of Nanoparticle Research

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 141–145

Gas and Pressure Dependence for the Mean Size of Nanoparticles Produced by Laser Ablation of Flowing Aerosols

  • William T. Nichols
  • Gokul Malyavanatham
  • Dale E. Henneke
  • James R. Brock
  • Michael F. Becker
  • John W. Keto
  • Howard D. Glicksman
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1010014004508

Cite this article as:
Nichols, W.T., Malyavanatham, G., Henneke, D.E. et al. Journal of Nanoparticle Research (2000) 2: 141. doi:10.1023/A:1010014004508

Abstract

Silver nanoparticles were produced by laser ablation of a continuously flowing aerosol of microparticles entrained in argon, nitrogen and helium at a variety of gas pressures. Nanoparticles produced in this new, high-volume nanoparticle production technique are compared with our earlier experiments using laser ablation of static microparticles. Transmission electron micrographs of the samples show the nanoparticles to be spherical and highly non-agglomerated under all conditions tested. These micrographs were analyzed to determine the effect of carrier gas type and pressure on size distributions. We conclude that mean diameters can be controlled from 4 to 20 nm by the choice of gas type and pressure. The smallest nanoparticles were produced in helium, with mean sizes increasing with increasing molecular weight of the carrier gas. These results are discussed in terms of a model based on cooling via collisional interaction of the nanoparticles, produced in the laser exploded microparticle, with the ambient gas.

nanoparticle synthesis aerosol processing laser ablation silver nanoparticles 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • William T. Nichols
    • 1
  • Gokul Malyavanatham
    • 2
  • Dale E. Henneke
    • 3
  • James R. Brock
    • 3
  • Michael F. Becker
    • 2
    • 4
  • John W. Keto
    • 5
    • 2
  • Howard D. Glicksman
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  2. 2.Texas Materials Institute – Materials Science and EngineeringThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  3. 3.Department of Chemical EngineeringThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  4. 4.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  5. 5.Department of PhysicsThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  6. 6.DuPont Electronic MaterialsWilmingtonUSA

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