Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 55–87

Learning Mathematics for Teaching: From a Teachers' Seminar to the Classroom

  • Deborah Schifter
Article

Abstract

A successful practice grounded in the principles that guide the current mathematics education reform effort requires a qualitatively different and significantly richer understanding of mathematics than most teachers currently possess. However, it is not as clear how teachers' mathematical understandings develop and how those understandings affect instruction. This paper explores two avenues for K-6 teachers' mathematical development, (a) engagement in inquiry into mathematics itself, and (b) investigation of children's mathematical thinking, illustrating how the need for these two kinds of investigations arises in classroom situations and how they can be pursued in a professional development setting.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah Schifter

There are no affiliations available

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