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GeoInformatica

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 61–99 | Cite as

Survey of Spatio-Temporal Databases

  • Tamas Abraham
  • John F. Roddick
Article

Abstract

Spatio-temporal databases aim to support extensions to existing models of Spatial Information Systems (SIS) to include time in order to better describe our dynamic environment. Although interest into this area has increased in the past decade, a number of important issues remain to be investigated. With the advances made in temporal database research, we can expect a more unified approach towards aspatial temporal data in SIS and a wider discussion on spatio-temporal data models. This paper provides an overview of previous achievements within the field and highlights areas currently receiving or requiring further investigation.

spatio-temporal databases survey 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tamas Abraham
    • 1
  • John F. Roddick
    • 1
  1. 1.Advanced Computing Research Centre, School of Computer and Information ScienceUniversity of South Australia, The Levels CampusMawson LakesAustralia

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