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Teaching Business Ethics

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 163–181 | Cite as

Using Computer-Based Simulation Exercises to Teach Business Ethics

  • Paul L. Schumann
  • Philip H. Anderson
  • Timothy W. Scott
Article

Abstract

This paper discusses how to introduce ethical dilemmas into computer-based business simulation exercise to teach business ethics. Simulations have an inherent advantage over other pedagogies for teaching ethics because simulations provide students with both an intellectual and a behavioral exposure to the topic. Issues addressed include considerations before writing ethical dilemmas, the writing of ethical dilemmas, and process issues for introducing ethical dilemmas. An example is developed and discussed. Through the process described, instructors can better prepare students for a lifetime of tough business decisions.

business computer ethics experiential simulation teaching 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul L. Schumann
    • 1
  • Philip H. Anderson
    • 1
  • Timothy W. Scott
    • 1
  1. 1.Mankato State UniversityMankato

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