Molecular Breeding

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 25–33

Comparative analysis of transgenic rice plants obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and particle bombardment

  • Shunhong Dai
  • Ping Zheng
  • Philippe Marmey
  • Shiping Zhang
  • Wenzhong Tian
  • Shouyi Chen
  • Roger N. Beachy
  • Claude Fauquet
Article

Abstract

We compared rice transgenic plants obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated and particle bombardment transformation by carrying out molecular analyses of the T0, T1 and T2 transgenic plants. Oryzasativa japonica rice (c.v. Taipei 309) was transformed with a construct (pWNHG) that carried genes coding for neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII), hygromycin phosphotransferase (Hygr), and β-glucuronidase (GUS). Thirteen and fourteen transgenic lines produced via either method were selected and subjected to molecular analysis. Based on our data, we could draw the following conclusions. Average gene copy numbers of the three transgenes were 1.8 and 2.7 for transgenic plants obtained by Agrobacterium and by particle bombardment, respectively. The percentage of transgenic plants containing intact copies of foreign genes, especially non-selection genes, was higher for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. GUS gene expression level in transgenic plants obtained from Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was more stable overall the transgenic plant lines obtained by particle bombardment. Most of the transgenic plants obtained from the two transformation systems gave a Mendelian segregation pattern of foreign genes in T1 and T2 generations. Co-segregation was observed for lines obtained from particle bombardment, however, that was not always the case for T1 lines obtained from Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Fertility of transgenic plants obtained from Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was better. In summary, the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a good system to obtain transgenic plants with lower copy number, intact foreign gene and stable gene expression, while particle bombardment is a high efficiency system to produce large number of transgenic plants with a wide range of gene expression.

Agrobacterium Biolistic Rice Transgene analysis 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shunhong Dai
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ping Zheng
    • 1
  • Philippe Marmey
    • 1
  • Shiping Zhang
    • 1
  • Wenzhong Tian
    • 2
  • Shouyi Chen
    • 2
  • Roger N. Beachy
    • 1
  • Claude Fauquet
    • 1
  1. 1.ILTAB (ORSTOM/TSRI), Scripps Research InstituteLa JollaU.S.A
  2. 2.Institute of Genetics, Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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