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Computational & Mathematical Organization Theory

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 381–394 | Cite as

Ontologies to Support Process Integration in Enterprise Engineering

  • Michael Grüninger
  • Katy Atefi
  • Mark S. Fox
Article

Abstract

Enterprise design knowledge is currently descriptive, ad hoc, or pre-scientific. One reason for this state of affairs in enterprise design is that existing approaches lack an adequate specification of the terminology of the enterprise models, which leads to inconsistent interpretation and uses of knowledge. We use the formal enterprise models being developed as part of the Toronto Virtual Enterprise (TOVE) project to provide a precise specification of enterprise structure, and use this structure to characterize process integration within the enterprise. We then use the constraints within the enterprise model to define a special class of enterprises, and discuss the concepts necessary to characterize process integration within this class. The results of this paper arose out of the successful application of these ontologies to the analysis of the IBM Opportunity Management Process in a joint project with IBM Canada.

enterprise design ontologies information 

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Grüninger
    • 1
  • Katy Atefi
    • 1
  • Mark S. Fox
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Industrial EngineeringUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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