Systemic Practice and Action Research

, Volume 13, Issue 5, pp 623–643 | Cite as

The Current Version of Emery's Open Systems Theory

  • Merrelyn Emery
Article

Abstract

There are variations on the idea of an open systems theory (OST) or socioecology. This paper deals with the "current" variant developed primarily by Fred Emery, or OST(E). It is "current" because that terminology acknowledges a continuing development of knowledge. OST(E) is heir to a long line of intellectual development known as the "thin red line" and can be distinguished from other variants by its adherence to that line of development. The paper outlines the state of the art of OST(E) and its historical relation to the thin rd line.

coevolution contextualism genotypical design principles interaction learning open systems participative democracy transaction 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Merrelyn Emery
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Continuing EducationAustralian National UniversityAustralia
  2. 2.Fred Emery InstituteCookAustralia

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