Treatment of Sexual Offenders Who Are in Categorical Denial: A Pilot Project

  • W. L. Marshall
  • David Thornton
  • Liam E. Marshall
  • Yolanda M. Fernandez
  • Ruth Mann
Article

Abstract

This paper describes an approach to treatment for sexual offenders who are in categorical denial. Other efforts to have them, at least partially, admit responsibility had failed and they were to be released from prison without any treatment. Evidence that suggests denial is not predictive of risk and that treatment may reduce the risk of these offenders is reviewed. Essentially, this paper offers a possible approach to dealing with these intractable deniers which, it is suggested, is better than not trying to modify their risk, and that may prove to be effective

sexual offender denial categorical denial absolute denial treatment 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. L. Marshall
    • 1
  • David Thornton
    • 3
  • Liam E. Marshall
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yolanda M. Fernandez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ruth Mann
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyQueen's UniversityKingstonCanada
  2. 2.Bath Institution Sexual Offenders' ProgramCanada
  3. 3.Programme Development SectionHM Prison ServiceLondonEngland, UK

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