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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 289–295 | Cite as

Drug Use and Risk for HIV Among Women Arrestees in California

  • Christine E. Grella
  • Jeffrey J. Annon
  • M. Douglas Anglin
Article

Abstract

The rate of women entering the criminal justice system, particularly from drug-related crimes, is increasing. This study examined the characteristics and HIV risk behaviors of drug-using women arrestees in 13 California counties (N = 532). The injecting drug users (IDUs) (18%) were compared with the noninjecting drug users. The IDUs were older, more often White than African American, and were more likely to have a history of STDs, previous arrest, and polydrug use. Although the IDUs were at higher risk for HIV from their injection drug use and greater involvement in sex work, a substantial number of non-IDUs also engaged in high-risk sexual behaviors. Only a small percentage of the women sampled tested positive for HIV antibodies, however, the generally high-risk profile of this sample of drug-using women arrestees suggests that they would benefit from interventions that link them with needed treatment and services.

HIV risk women arrestees injection drug users 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christine E. Grella
    • 1
  • Jeffrey J. Annon
    • 2
  • M. Douglas Anglin
    • 2
  1. 1.Drug Abuse Research Center, Neuropsychiatric InstituteUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos Angeles
  2. 2.Drug Abuse Research Center, Neuropsychiatric InstituteUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos Angeles

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