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Journal of Psychotherapy Integration

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 263–282 | Cite as

A Common Factors Approach to Psychotherapy Training

  • Louis G. Castonguay
Article

Abstract

This article addresses training in psychotherapy integration from the perspective of common factors. Problems related to this training perspective are first reviewed. As an attempt to deal with such problems, current teaching and supervision efforts by the author are briefly described. Based on a developmental model of clinical learning, a sketch of a more comprehensive program of integrative psychotherapy training is advanced.

psychotherapy training psychotherapy integration common factors 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louis G. Castonguay
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe Pennsylvania State UniversiyUniversity Park

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