Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 39–103 | Cite as

The Peopling of the New World: Present Evidence, New Theories, and Future Directions

  • Stuart J. Fiedel
Article

Abstract

The prevailing archaeological consensus on Paleoindian origins and colonization of the Americas has been shaken by recent wide acknowledgment of pre-Clovis occupation at Monte Verde, Chile, and by claims that ostensibly non-Mongoloid skeletal remains might represent a precursor population. Recent mitochondrial DNA studies have been interpreted by some as indicating an earlier and more complex peopling of the continent. This paper reviews the current archaeological and biological evidence, in America and northern Asia, for the origins of Native Americans, assesses models of the colonization process in the light of new data and a revised chronology, and suggests avenues for future research.

Paleoindian Clovis migration routes peopling colonization Late Pleistocene America Northeast Asia 

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