Biometals

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 179–185 | Cite as

Copper uptake and intracellular distribution in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell line

  • Simonetta Ferruzza
  • Yula Sambuy
  • Maria Rosa Ciriolo
  • Angelo De Martino
  • Paolo Santaroni
  • Giuseppe Rotilio
  • Maria-Laura Scarino
Article

Abstract

The apical uptake of 64CuCl2 was investigated in human differentiated intestinal Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports. At pH 6.0 in the apical compartment, the uptake of copper was linear over the first 6 min and between 10 and 80 μM CuCl2 exhibited non-saturable transport kinetics. In addition, copper uptake was energy-independent, affected by the valency state of copper, preferring Cu(II) over Cu(I), and not influenced by high (10 mM) extracellular calcium. The intracellular distribution of copper was investigated by FPLC at different times of uptake (`pulse') and of `chase'. Intracellular copper initially bound predominantly to low molecular weight components (i.e., glutathione), and subsequently shifted to higher molecular weight components such as metallothionein and Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase.

GSH heavy metals metallothionein passive uptake 64Cu 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simonetta Ferruzza
    • 1
  • Yula Sambuy
    • 1
  • Maria Rosa Ciriolo
    • 2
  • Angelo De Martino
    • 3
  • Paolo Santaroni
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Rotilio
    • 1
    • 3
  • Maria-Laura Scarino
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca per gli Alimenti e la NutrizioneRomaItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Scienze BiomedicheUniversità di Chieti, `G. D'Annunzio'ChietiItaly (Fax
  3. 3.Dipartimento di BiologiaUniversità di Roma `Tor Vergata'RomaItaly

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