Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 11, Issue 6, pp 497–512

Patterns of inpatient surgeries for the top four cancers in the United States, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 1988–95

  • Phyllis A. Wingo
  • Jodie L. Guest
  • LaMar McGinnis
  • Daniel S. Miller
  • Carmen Rodriguez
  • Cheryll J. Cardinez
  • Brian Morrow
  • Michael J. Thun
Article

Abstract

Background: At a time when the population is aging and medical practices are rapidly changing, ongoing surveillance of surgical treatments for cancer is valuable for health services planning.

Methods: We used data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey for patients with discharge diagnoses of lung, prostate, female breast, and colorectal cancer during 1988–95 to estimate population-based rates and numbers of inpatient surgical procedures.

Results: In 1988–91, rates of lobectomy for lung cancer were significantly higher in males than females. By 1994–95, the male/female differences had largely disappeared due to increasing trends among females and decreasing trends among males. During 1988–95, surgeries on the large intestine for colorectal cancer, including right hemicolectomy and sigmoidectomy, decreased significantly, as did abdominoperineal resections of the rectum. Anterior resections of the rectum increased significantly. Radical prostatectomies for prostate cancer increased from 34,000 in 1988–89 to 104,000 in 1992–93 and then decreased to 87,000 in 1994–95; rates followed a similar pattern. Finally, the number and rates of inpatient mastectomies for female breast cancer decreased over the study period (from 219,000 to 180,000 and from 78.8 to 61.5 per 100,000, respectively).

Conclusion: These trends in inpatient surgeries for the major cancers in the US probably reflect changes in disease occurrence and modified treatment recommendations.

breast cancer colon cancer lung cancer neoplasm prostate cancer surveillance treatment 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phyllis A. Wingo
    • 1
  • Jodie L. Guest
    • 2
  • LaMar McGinnis
    • 1
  • Daniel S. Miller
    • 3
  • Carmen Rodriguez
    • 1
  • Cheryll J. Cardinez
    • 1
  • Brian Morrow
    • 4
  • Michael J. Thun
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Surveillance ResearchAmerican Cancer SocietyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Affairs Medical CenterDecaturUSA
  3. 3.Division of Cancer Prevention and ControlCenters for Disease Control and PreventionChambleeUSA
  4. 4.Klemm Analysis GroupAtlantaUSA

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