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Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 377–382 | Cite as

Surface quality control using biocomputational algorithms

  • J. Leopold
Article

Abstract

The visual inspection of three-dimensional parts is one task within manufacturing that has been automated at a comparatively slow pace. Inspection is the process of determining if a product deviates from a given set of specifications. Inspection usually involves measurement of specific features of a part, such as assembly integrity, geometric dimensions and surface finish. A main goal of the Project ‘NATHAN’ was to design and simulate the behaviour of a new generation of algorithms based on results in the discipline of biocomputing.

Surface quality control image processing biocomputing 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Leopold
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Calculation and TestingSociety for Production Engineering and DevelopmentChemnitzGermany

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