Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 137–144 | Cite as

A pooled analysis of thyroid cancer studies. V. Anthropometric factors

  • Luigino Dal Maso
  • Carlo La Vecchia
  • Silvia Franceschi
  • Susan Preston-Martin
  • Elaine Ron
  • Fabio Levi
  • Wendy Mack
  • Steven D. Mark
  • Anne McTiernan
  • Laurence Kolonel
  • Kiyohiko Mabuchi
  • Fan Jin
  • Gun Wingren
  • Maria Rosaria Galanti
  • Arne Hallquist
  • Eystein Glattre
  • Eiliv Lund
  • Dimitrios Linos
  • Eva Negri
Article

Abstract

Objective: To assess the relation between anthropometric factors and thyroid cancer risk in a pooled analysis of individual data from 12 case–control studies conducted in the US, Japan, China and Europe.

Methods: 2056 female and 417 male cases, 3358 female and 965 male controls were considered. Odds ratios (OR) were derived from logistic regression, conditioning on age, A-bomb exposure (Japan) and study, and adjusting for radiotherapy.

Results: Compared to the lowest tertile of height, the pooled OR was 1.2 for females for the highest one, and 1.5 for males, and trends in risk were significant. With reference to weight at diagnosis, the OR for females was 1.2 for the highest tertile, and the trend in risk was significant, whereas no association was observed in males. Body mass index (BMI) at diagnosis was directly related to thyroid cancer risk in females (OR = 1.2 for the highest tertile), but not in males. No consistent pattern of risk emerged with BMI during the late teens. Most of the associations were observed both for papillary and follicular cancers, and in all age groups. However, significant heterogeneity was observed across studies.

Conclusions: Height and weight at diagnosis are moderately related to thyroid cancer risk.

body mass index case–control studies height risk thyroid cancer weight 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luigino Dal Maso
    • 1
  • Carlo La Vecchia
    • 2
    • 3
  • Silvia Franceschi
    • 1
  • Susan Preston-Martin
    • 4
  • Elaine Ron
    • 5
  • Fabio Levi
    • 6
  • Wendy Mack
    • 4
  • Steven D. Mark
    • 5
  • Anne McTiernan
    • 7
  • Laurence Kolonel
    • 8
  • Kiyohiko Mabuchi
    • 9
  • Fan Jin
    • 10
  • Gun Wingren
    • 11
  • Maria Rosaria Galanti
    • 12
  • Arne Hallquist
    • 13
  • Eystein Glattre
    • 14
  • Eiliv Lund
    • 15
  • Dimitrios Linos
    • 16
  • Eva Negri
    • 2
  1. 1.Centro di Riferimento OncologicoAviano, PNItaly
  2. 2.Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”MilanItaly
  3. 3.Istituto di Statistica Medica e BiometriaUniversità degli Studi di MilanoMilanItaly
  4. 4.Department of Preventive MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and GeneticsNational Cancer InstituteRockvilleUSA
  6. 6.Registre Vaudois des TumeursLausanneSwitzerland
  7. 7.Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  8. 8.Cancer Research Center of HawaiiUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA
  9. 9.Radiation Effects Research FoundationHiroshimaJapan
  10. 10.Shanghai Cancer InstituteShanghaiPeople's Republic of China
  11. 11.Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Health SciencesLinköping UniversityLinköpingSweden
  12. 12.Department of Cancer EpidemiologyUniversity HospitalUppsalaSweden
  13. 13.Department of OncologyKarolinska Institute and Stockholms SjukhemStockholmSweden
  14. 14.Cancer Registry of Norway, MontebelloOsloNorway
  15. 15.Institute of Community MedicineUniversity of TromsØTromsØNorway
  16. 16.Institute of Preventive MedicineKifissiaGreece

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