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Towards a Model for Teacher Development in Technology Education: From Research to Practice

  • Alister Jones
  • Vicki Compton
Article

Abstract

This paper reports on a series of interventions in New Zealand schools in order to enhance the teaching of, and learning in, technology as a new learning area. It details the way in which researchers worked with teachers to introduce technological activities into the classroom, the teachers' reflections on this process and the subsequent development of activities. These activities were undertaken in 14 classrooms (8 primary and 6 secondary).

The research took into account past experiences of school-based teacher development and recommendations related to teacher change. Extensive use was made of case-studies from earlier phases of the research, and of the draft technology curriculum, in order to develop teachers' concepts of technology and technology education. Teachers then worked from these concepts to develop technological activities and classroom strategies. The paper also introduces a model that outlines factors contributing to school technological literacy, and suggests that teacher development models will need to allow teachers to develop technological knowledge and an understanding of technological practice, as well as concepts of technology and technology education, if they are to become effective in the teaching of technology.

implementation teacher change teacher development technology education 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alister Jones
    • 1
  • Vicki Compton
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education ResearchUniversity of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand

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