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Biodiversity & Conservation

, Volume 7, Issue 7, pp 895–914 | Cite as

The dynamics of trade in live wildlife across the Guangxi border between China and Vietnam during 1993–1996 and its control strategies

  • Li Yiming
  • Li Dianmo
Article

Abstract

A survey on trade in live wild animals was conducted along the Guangxi border between China and Vietnam during 1993–1996. The results showed that there were 55 species, which were underestimated, involved in the trade, including 15 species of mammals, 10 species of birds, 29 species of reptiles and 1 species of amphibian. Many of them were species listed on Appendices I and II of CITES and on China's protection list (known as ASSP). During the investigation, about 2.29–29.325 tons of wildlife per day were imported to China form Vietnam. Some species with a large volume of trade may be over-exploited. Sixty-three percent of middle–high quality restaurants in three border cities and Nanning in Guangxi sold wildlife foods. Twenty kinds of wild animals were eaten at the restaurants. Although numbers of species involved in the trade remained fairly stable over the survey period, numbers of species listed in Appendices I and II of CITES and the state protection list had declined. The scale of wildlife markets in border cities of Guangxi and consumption levels of wildlife in the restaurants had been reduced because border control measures were enforced on the trade by local governments of China. However, the prices of the 5 main species in wildlife markets were still going up. This suggested that demand for wildlife in Guangxi was strong and will facilitate the illegal trade. The key steps to control the illegal wildlife trade between the two countries should focus on (i)␣suppression of illegal wildlife markets and prohibition of the sale of wildlife food in restaurants consisting of species listed in the ASSP inventory; (ii) international cooperation in the control of the trade; (iii) tighter enforcement of CITES for both countries; (iv) control of invasion of exotic species and epidemics of disease in the trade in China; and (v) education for wildlife conservation in China.

wildlife trade sustainable use invasion of exotic species epidemics of diseases CITES biodiversity conservation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li Yiming
    • 1
  • Li Dianmo
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of SciencesHaidian, BeijingChina

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