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Quality of Life Research

, Volume 7, Issue 6, pp 513–519 | Cite as

Patients' experiences using a computerized program with a touch-sensitive video monitor for the assessment of health-related quality of life.

  • J. Buxton
  • M. White
  • D. Osoba
Article

Abstract

This study assessed patients' experiences using a computerized program with a touch-sensitive video monitor (TSVM) for the assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A software program was developed for a computerized form of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire, the QLQ-C30. One hundred and seventy-eight patients completed the QLQ-C30, followed by a structured interview designed to assess perceived difficulties with the use of the TSVM. Patients were asked to evaluate the ease of use of different aspects of the TSVM system (using the touch-sensitive screen, entering the patient identification number, reading the screen and following the on-screen instructions). The majority of patients found all aspects of the TSVM system ‘very easy’ to use. A few patients (1–2%) admitted finding any aspect of the TSVM use ‘somewhat difficult’ and none ranked any aspect as ‘very difficult’. There were no unanswered items in the QLQ-C30. All patients found the amount of time spent on answering the questionnaire acceptable, (the mean time to complete was 6.8 min with a median of 5 min) and 96% stated they were willing to complete a similar questionnaire on a future occasion. From the patients' perspective the TSVM system appears to be a highly acceptable approach for the collection of HRQoL data in clinical practice.

Health-related quality of life computerized assessment touch-sensitive video monitor QLQ-C30 

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Buxton
    • 1
  • M. White
    • 1
  • D. Osoba
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Health Care and EpidemiologyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Quality of Life Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency and theUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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