Quality of Life Research

, Volume 7, Issue 5, pp 387–397 | Cite as

The proxy problem: child report versus parent report in health-related quality of life research

  • N. C. M. Theunissen*
  • T. G. C. Vogels
  • H. M. Koopman
  • G. H. W. Verrips
  • K. A. H. Zwinderman
  • S. P. Verloove-Vanhorick
  • J. M. Wit
Article

Abstract

This study evaluates the agreement between child and parent reports on children's health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a representative sample of 1,105 Dutch children (age 8–11 years old). Both children and their parents completed a 56 item questionnaire (TACQOL). The questionnaire contains seven eight-item scales: physical complaints, motor functioning, autonomy, cognitive functioning, social functioning, positive emotions and negative emotions. The Pearson correlations between the child and parent reports were between 0.44 and 0.61 (p<0.001). The intraclass correlations were between 0.39 and 0.62. On average, the children reported a significantly lower HRQoL than their parents on the physical complaints, motor functioning, autonomy, cognitive functioning and positive emotions scales (paired t-test: p<0.05). Agreement on all of the scales was related to the magnitude of the HRQoL scores and to some background variables (gender, age, temporary illness and visiting a physician). According to multitrait-multimethod analyses, both the child and parent reports proved to be valid.

Health-related quality of life health status; proxy; child report; parent report. 

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. C. M. Theunissen*
    • 1
  • T. G. C. Vogels
    • 2
  • H. M. Koopman
    • 3
  • G. H. W. Verrips
    • 2
  • K. A. H. Zwinderman
    • 3
  • S. P. Verloove-Vanhorick
    • 2
  • J. M. Wit
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.TNO Prevention and Healthc[LeidenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands

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