Journal of Real Estate Literature

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 183–196

The Determination of Rent in Shopping Centers: Some Evidence from Hong Kong

  • Richard S. Tay
  • Clement K. Lau
  • Marie S. Leung
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to assess the generality of previous empirical findings on the determinants of retail rent in shopping centers and validate their substantive robustness using data from Hong Kong. Consistent with previous findings, the rental rate of a retail unit is positively related to its customer-generating power and the size of the shopping center but negatively related to its own size. In contrast to previous findings, it is positively associated with chain stores and the age of the shopping center but not significantly related to several provisions in the lease.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard S. Tay
    • 1
  • Clement K. Lau
    • 2
  • Marie S. Leung
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Economics and MarketingLincoln UniversityCanterburyNew Zealand
  2. 2.Land DevelopmentSAR GovernmentHong Kong
  3. 3.Kintel InternationalHong Kong

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