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Journal of Mathematical Imaging and Vision

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 237–252 | Cite as

Linear Scale-Space has First been Proposed in Japan

  • Joachim Weickert
  • Seiji Ishikawa
  • Atsushi Imiya
Article

Abstract

Linear scale-space is considered to be a modern bottom-up tool in computer vision. The American and European vision community, however, is unaware of the fact that it has already been axiomatically derived in 1959 in a Japanese paper by Taizo Iijima. This result formed the starting point of vast linear scale-space research in Japan ranging from various axiomatic derivations over deep structure analysis to applications to optical character recognition. Since the outcomes of these activities are unknown to western scale-space researchers, we give an overview of the contribution to the development of linear scale-space theories and analyses. In particular, we review four Japanese axiomatic approaches that substantiate linear scale-space theories proposed between 1959 and 1981. By juxtaposing them to ten American or European axiomatics, we present an overview of the state-of-the-art in Gaussian scale-space axiomatics. Furthermore, we show that many techniques for analysing linear scale-space have also been pioneered by Japanese researchers.

scale-space axiomatics deep structure optical character recognition (OCR) 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joachim Weickert
    • 1
  • Seiji Ishikawa
    • 2
  • Atsushi Imiya
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.Department of Control EngineeringKyushu Institute of TechnologyTobata, KitakyushuJapan
  3. 3.Department of Information and Computer Sciences, Faculty of EngineeringChiba UniversityChibaJapan. imiya@ics.tj.chiba-u.ac.jp

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