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Crime, Law and Social Change

, Volume 32, Issue 3, pp 257–278 | Cite as

Sex trafficking and the mainstream of market culture

  • Ian Taylor
  • Ruth Jamieson
Article

Abstract

The majority of analyses of the international trade in women focusses on the rôle of organised crime groups in the supply and delivery of women across borders and into the local sex trade. This paper (a) attempts to locate the demand for traded women in a broader analysis of changes in the political economy of ‘developed’ studies and (b) more specifically situates the trade in women in relation to the new-found centrality of sex in the mainstream of popular culture.

Keywords

Political Economy International Trade International Relation Popular Culture Organise Crime 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Taylor
    • 1
  • Ruth Jamieson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Social PolicyUniversity of DurhamEngland
  2. 2.Department of CriminologyKeele UniversityEngland

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