Biodegradation

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 83–90 | Cite as

Biodegradation of crude oil by soil microorganisms in the tropic

  • Manee Palittapongarnpim
  • Prayad Pokethitiyook
  • Edward Suchart Upatham
  • Ladda Tangbanluekal
Article

Abstract

Five microorganisms, three bacteria and two yeasts, capable of degrading Tapis light crude oil were isolated from oil-contaminated soil in Bangkok, Thailand. Soil enrichment culture was done by inoculating the soil in mineral salt medium with 0.5% v/v Tapis crude oil as the sole carbon source. Crude oil biodegradation was measured by gas chromatography method. Five strains of pure microorganisms with petroleum degrading ability were isolated: three were bacteria and the other two were yeasts. Candida tropicalis strains 7Y and 15Y were identified as efficient oil degraders. Strain 15Y was more efficient, it was able to reduce 87.3% of the total petroleum or 99.6% of n-alkanes within the 7-day incubation period at room temperature of 25 ± 2 °C.

alkanes biodegradation Candida tropicalis crude oil gas chromatography petroleum 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manee Palittapongarnpim
  • Prayad Pokethitiyook
  • Edward Suchart Upatham
  • Ladda Tangbanluekal

There are no affiliations available

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