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Journal of Applied Phycology

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 369–376 | Cite as

World seaweed utilisation: An end-of-century summary

  • W. Lindsey Zemke-White
  • Masao Ohno
Article

Abstract

The data for worldwide seaweed production for the years 1994/1995 are summarised. At least 221 species of seaweed were used, with145 species for food and 101 species for phycocolloid production. 2,005,459 t dry weight was produced, with 90% coming from China, France, UK, Korea, Japan and Chile. 1,033,650 t dry weight was cultured with 90% coming from China, Korea and Japan. Just four genera made up 93% of the cultured seaweed: Laminaria (682,581 t dry wt), Porphyra (130,614 t dry wt), Undaria (101,708 t dry wt) and Gracilaria (50,165 t dry wt). The value of the harvest was in excess of US $ 6.2 billion. Since 1984 the production of seaweeds worldwide has grown by 119%.

culture harvest seaweed phycocolloid alginate carrageenan food fertiliser world utilisation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Lindsey Zemke-White
    • 1
  • Masao Ohno
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Usa Marine Biological InstituteKochi UniversityUsa-cho, Tosa, KochiJapan

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