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International Journal of Computer Vision

, Volume 32, Issue 2, pp 111–146 | Cite as

General Object Reconstruction Based on Simplex Meshes

  • Hervé Delingette
Article

Abstract

In this paper, we propose a general tridimensional reconstruction algorithm of range and volumetric images, based on deformable simplex meshes. Simplex meshes are topologically dual of triangulations and have the advantage of permitting smooth deformations in a simple and efficient manner. Our reconstruction algorithm can handle surfaces without any restriction on their shape or topology. The different tasks performed during the reconstruction include the segmentation of given objects in the scene, the extrapolation of missing data, and the control of smoothness, density, and geometric quality of the reconstructed meshes. The reconstruction takes place in two stages. First, the initialization stage creates a simplex mesh in the vicinity of the data model either manually or using an automatic procedure. Then, after a few iterations, the mesh topology can be modified by creating holes or by increasing its genus. Finally, an iterative refinement algorithm decreases the distance of the mesh from the data while preserving high geometric and topological quality. Several reconstruction examples are provided with quantitative and qualitative results.

image segmentation deformable models 3D reconstruction medical imaging range images 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hervé Delingette
    • 1
  1. 1.INRIASophia Antipolis CedexFrance

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