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International Journal of Computer Vision

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 187–197 | Cite as

Visual Surveillance for Moving Vehicles

  • James M. Ferryman
  • Stephen J. Maybank
  • Anthony D. Worrall
Article

Abstract

An overview is given of a vision system for locating, recognising and tracking multiple vehicles, using an image sequence taken by a single camera mounted on a moving vehicle. The camera motion is estimated by matching features on the ground plane from one image to the next. Vehicle detection and hypothesis generation are performed using template correlation and a 3D wire frame model of the vehicle is fitted to the image. Once detected and identified, vehicles are tracked using dynamic filtering. A separate batch mode filter obtains the 3D trajectories of nearby vehicles over an extended time. Results are shown for a motorway image sequence.

model-based vision surveillance traffic scene analysis vehicle tracking filtering 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Ferryman
    • 1
  • Stephen J. Maybank
    • 1
  • Anthony D. Worrall
    • 1
  1. 1.Computational Vision Group, Department of Computer ScienceThe University of ReadingBerkshireEngland, UK

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