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Reconfigurable Computing for Digital Signal Processing: A Survey

  • Russell Tessier
  • Wayne Burleson
Article

Abstract

Steady advances in VLSI technology and design tools have extensively expanded the application domain of digital signal processing over the past decade. While application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and programmable digital signal processors (PDSPs) remain the implementation mechanisms of choice for many DSP applications, increasingly new system implementations based on reconfigurable computing are being considered. These flexible platforms, which offer the functional efficiency of hardware and the programmability of software, are quickly maturing as the logic capacity of programmable devices follows Moore's Law and advanced automated design techniques become available. As initial reconfigurable technologies have emerged, new academic and commercial efforts have been initiated to support power optimization, cost reduction, and enhanced run-time performance.

This paper presents a survey of academic research and commercial development in reconfigurable computing for DSP systems over the past fifteen years. This work is placed in the context of other available DSP implementation media including ASICs and PDSPs to fully document the range of design choices available to system engineers. It is shown that while contemporary reconfigurable computing can be applied to a variety of DSP applications including video, audio, speech, and control, much work remains to realize its full potential. While individual implementations of PDSP, ASIC, and reconfigurable resources each offer distinct advantages, it is likely that integrated combinations of these technologies will provide more complete solutions.

signal processing reconfigurable computing FPGA survey 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russell Tessier
    • 1
  • Wayne Burleson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity of MassachusettsAmherstUSA

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