Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 53, Issue 2, pp 121–132 | Cite as

Proximate composition and some functional properties of extrusion cooked soybean and sweet potato blends

  • M.O. Iwe
  • P.O. Ngoddy
Article

Abstract

Mixtures of sweet potato flour and soy flour were made in a pilot mixer. They were moisturized with 18, 25, and 30% water and extruded in a single screw extruder at 80 rpm, using a die of 6mm. Extrusion temperature was maintained at 100 ± 3°C. Effects of adding soy flour into sweet potato flour, as well as variation in feed moisture on the composition and some functional properties of the extrudates were investigated. Increase in sweet potato content increased carbohydrate values. Protein increased with increase in soy flour. Feed moisture did not significantly ( p ≤ 0.05) affect extrudate composition. Increase in sweet potato content and feed moisture increased expansion ratio. Bulk density decreased with decrease in feed moisture, but increased with increase in soy flour. Starch content increased as sweet potato content increased. Degree of gelatinization increased with sweet potato content. Lower feed moisture enhanced gelatinization. Water absorption index (WAI) increased as sweet potato content increased. Feed moisture had a slight effect on WAI and water solubility index (WSI). Amylose increased with increase in sweet potato content. Increase in soy flour led to an increase in yellowness (b*) of extrudates.

Composition Extrusion cooked Functional properties Soy-sweet potato blends 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • M.O. Iwe
    • 1
  • P.O. Ngoddy
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Agriculture, MakurdiMakurdi Benue StateNigeria
  2. 2.University of Nigeria, NsukkaEnugu StateNigeria

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