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Cytotechnology

, Volume 23, Issue 1–3, pp 95–101 | Cite as

Basal medium development for serum-free culture: a historical perspective

  • David Jayme
  • Toshio Watanabe
  • Toshiaki Shimada
Article

Abstract

The evolution of basal synthetic formulations to support mammalian cell culture applications has been facilitated by the contributions of many investigators. Definition of minimally-required nutrient categories by Harry Eagle in the 1950's spawned an iterative process of continuous modification and refinement of the exogenous environment to cultivate new cell types and to support emerging applications of cultured mammalian cells. Key historical elements are traced, leading to the development of high potency, basal nutrient formulations capable of sustaining serum-free proliferation and biological production. Emerging techniques for alimentation of fed batch and continuous perfusion bioreactors, using partial nutrient concentrates deduced from spent medium analysis, can enhance medium utilization and bioreactor productivity.

Keywords

Nutrient Category Spend Medium Mammalian Cell Culture Medium Utilization Nutrient Formulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Jayme
    • 1
  • Toshio Watanabe
    • 1
  • Toshiaki Shimada
    • 2
  1. 1.Life Technologies, Inc.Grand IslandUSA
  2. 2.Life Technologies OrientalTokyoJapan

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