Journal of Applied Phycology

, 9:29

A comparison of screening methods for antioxidant activity in seaweeds

  • R. Matsukawa
  • Z. Dubinsky
  • E. Kishimoto
  • K. Masaki
  • Y. Masuda
  • T. Takeuchi
  • M. Chihara
  • Y. Yamamoto
  • E. Niki
  • I. Karube
Article

Abstract

The inhibition of lipid peroxidation and radical scavenging effects were studied to evaluate the antioxidant activity for extracts of 17 species of seaweed. The antioxidant effect was evaluated by determination of lipoxygenase activity and by α, α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) decolorization. Lipoxygenase activity was depressed in the presence of aqueous and ethanol extracts of 4 algal species; Sargassum species had the highest antioxidant activity of all the species examined. The ethanol extracts of one Sargassum species showed competitive inhibition with the substrate. The same species also showed radical scavenging activity in the DPPH decolorization test. Comparison of these results shows no relationship between enzyme inhibition and radical scavenging activity.

antioxidant activity screening lipoxygenase inhibition radical scavenging activity seaweed 

References

  1. Ben-Aziz A, Grossman S, Ascarelli I, Budowski P (1970) Linoleate oxidation induced by lipoxygenase and heme proteins: A direct spectrophotometric assay. Analyt. Biochem.34: 88–100.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Blois MS (1958) Antioxidant determinations by the use of a stable free radical. Nature 181: 1199–1200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Cahyana AH, Shuto Y, Kinoshita Y (1992) Pyropheophytin a as an antioxidative substance from the marine alga, Arame (Eisenia bicyclis). Biosci. Biotech. Biochem. 56: 1533–1535.Google Scholar
  4. Cook NC, Samman S (1996) Flavonoids Chemistry, metabolism, cardioprotective effects, and dietary sources. J. nutr. Biochem. 7: 66–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Dykens JA, Shick JM, Benoit C, Buettner GR, Winston GW (1992) Oxygen radical production in the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima and its endosymbiotic algae. J. exp. Biol. 168: 219–241.Google Scholar
  6. Ewing JC, Cosgrove JP, Giamalva DH, Church DF, Pryor WA(1989) Autoxidation of methyl linoleate initiated by the ozonide of allylbenzene. Lipids 24: 609–615.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Frankel EN(1979) Analytical methods used in the study of autoxidation processes. In Simic MG, Karel M. (eds) Autoxidation in Food and Biological Systems, Plenum Press, New York, 141–170.Google Scholar
  8. Fujimoto K, Kaneda T (1980) Screening test for antioxygenic compounds from marine algae and fractionation from Eisenia bicyclis and Undaria pinnatifida. Bull. Japan. Soc. Sci. Fish. 46: 1125–1130.Google Scholar
  9. Fujimoto K, Ohmura H, Kaneda T (1985) Screening for antioxygenic compounds in marine algae and bromophenols as effective principles in a red alga Polysiphonia ulceolate. Bull. Japan. Soc. Sci. Fish. 51: 1139–1143.Google Scholar
  10. Fukuzawa K, Takase S, Tsukatani H (1985) The effect of concentration on the antioxidant effectiveness of α-tocopherol in lipid peroxidation induced by superoxide free radicals. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 240: 117–120.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Grillo CA, Dulout FN (1995) Cytogenetic evaluation of butylated hydroxytoluene. Mutat. Res. 345: 73–78.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Holman RT, Bergstrom S (1951) Lipoxidase or unsaturated-fat oxidase. In Sumner JB, Myrbock K (eds) The Enzymes. Academic Press, New York, 1st ed, Vol. 2, Part 1, 559–580.Google Scholar
  13. Hsieh RJ, Kinsella JE (1986) Lipoxygenase catalyzed oxidation of N-6 and N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: Relevance to and activity in fish tissue. J. Food Sci. 51: 940–945.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Ito H, Sugiura M (1976) Antitumor polysaccharide fraction from Sargassum thunbergii. Chem. Pharm. Bull. 24: 1114–1115.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Itoh H, Noda H, Amano H, Zhuaug C, Mizuno T, Ito H (1993) Antitumor activity and immunological properties of marine algae polysaccharides, especially fucoidan, prepared from Sargassum thunbergii of Phaeophyceae. Antican. Res. 13: 2045–2052.Google Scholar
  16. Nakazawa S, Kuroda H, Abe F, Nishino T, Ootsuki M, Umesaki I (1974) Antitumor effect of aqueous-extracts from marine algae (I). Chemotherapy 22: 1435–1442.Google Scholar
  17. Nishida T, Matsukawa R, Masaki K, Dubinsky Z, Karube I (1996) A method for screening potential antioxidant activity. J. Biotechnol. 51: 149–155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Noda H, Amano H, Arashima K, Nisizawa K (1990) Antitumor activity of marine algae. Hydrobiologia 204/205: 577–584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Sukenik A, Zmora O, Carmeli Y (1993) Biochemical quality of marine unicellular algae with special emphasis lipid composition: II. Nannochloropsis sp. Aquaculture 117: 313–326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Tsuchihashi H, Kigoshi M, Iwatsuki M, Niki E (1995) Action of β-carotene as an antioxidant against lipid peroxidation. Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 323: 137–147.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Wang X, Witschi H (1995) Mutations of the Ki-ras protooncogene in 3-methylcholanthrene and urethane-induced and butylated hydroxytoluene-promoted lung tumors of strain A/J and SWR mice. Can. Res. 91: 33–39.Google Scholar
  22. Yamamoto I, Takahashi M, Suzuki T, Seino H, Mori H (1984) Antitumor effect of seaweeds. IV. Enhancement of antitumor activity by sulfation of a crude fucoidan fraction fro]n Sargassum kjellmanianum. Jap. J. exp. Med. 54: 143–151.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Zhuang C, Itoh H, Mizuno T, Ito H(1995) Antitumor active fucoidan from the brown seaweed, Umitoranoo (Sargassum thunbergii). Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem. 59: 563–567.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Matsukawa
    • 1
  • Z. Dubinsky
    • 2
  • E. Kishimoto
    • 3
  • K. Masaki
    • 4
  • Y. Masuda
    • 3
  • T. Takeuchi
    • 5
  • M. Chihara
    • 1
    • 6
  • Y. Yamamoto
    • 1
  • E. Niki
    • 1
  • I. Karube
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Center for Advanced Science and TechnologyThe University of TokyoMeguro-ku, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Life ScienceBar-Ilan UniversityRamat-GanIsrael
  3. 3.Faculty of EngineeringThe Science University of TokyoShinjuku-ku, TokyoJapan
  4. 4.Toyo Susan Kaisha LtdTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Faculty of Information ScienceHiroshima City UniversityNumata-cho, Asaminami-ku, HiroshimaJapan
  6. 6.Japanese Red Cross College of NursingShibuya-ku, TokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations