Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 67–79 | Cite as

Contemporary Muslim Families: Research and Practice

  • Marsha T. Carolan
  • Guiti Bagherinia
  • Rumaya Juhari
  • Jackie Himelright
  • Monica Mouton-Sanders

Abstract

This research project was undertaken to provide family professionals with the basic information necessary to work appropriately with Muslim families. The Muslim population represents 4–6 million people in the United States, yet it is significantly underrepresented in the family literature. Qualitative analysis of focus groups and interviews revealed multiple key findings. Emergent themes include an interest in gender respect rather than gender equity, the importance of extended family, the centralism of Islam in daily life and the qualified acceptance of professional interventions. Implications for practice are discussed.

Muslim family therapy gender 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marsha T. Carolan
    • 1
  • Guiti Bagherinia
    • 2
  • Rumaya Juhari
    • 2
  • Jackie Himelright
    • 2
  • Monica Mouton-Sanders
    • 2
  1. 1.Marriage and Family Therapy Specialization, Department of Family and Child EcologyMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing
  2. 2.Michigan State UniversityUSA

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