Journal of Insect Behavior

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 15–26 | Cite as

Behavioral Responses of Adult Deathwatch Beetles, Xestobium rufovillosum de Geer (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), to Light and Dark

  • Steven R. Belmain
  • Monique S. J. Simmonds
  • Walter M. Blaney

Abstract

Video tracking equipment was used to quantify the behavior of adult deathwatch beetles, Xestobium rufovillosum in a light/dark choice chamber. Effects of insect age, sex, and mating status on this behavior were analysed. The behavior recorded included the initial direction of movement, the time taken to reach the light or dark zone, the time spent in each zone, the time spent moving in each zone and the distance moved in each zone. The results show that both male and female insects 1–12 days old prefer the light zone. Insects more than 12 days old demonstrate sexually differential photoresponsive behavior. Males show a preference for the light. Females show an increasing preference for the dark, mated females more so than unmated females. The implications of these differences in behavior are discussed in relation to control programmes.

deathwatch beetle Xestobium rufovillosum Anobiidae selection behavior photo-response behavior 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven R. Belmain
    • 1
  • Monique S. J. Simmonds
    • 2
  • Walter M. Blaney
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Birkbeck CollegeUniversity of LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.Natural Resources InstituteKentUK
  3. 3.Department of Biology, Birkbeck CollegeUniversity of LondonLondonUK

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