European Journal of Epidemiology

, Volume 16, Issue 6, pp 501–506

VP7 and VP4 genotypes among rotavirus strains recovered from children with gastroenteritis over a 3-year period in Valencia, Spain

  • J. Buesa
  • C.O. de Souza
  • M. Asensi
  • C. Martínez
  • J. Prat
  • M.T. Gil
Article

Abstract

Between September 1996 and May 1999, the incidence and distribution of the main human rotavirus G genotypes (VP7 associated: G1–G4) and P genotypes (VP4 associated: P[8], P[4], P[6] and P[9]) among children with rotavirus gastroenteritis were determined using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based genotyping methods. From a total of 145 rotavirus strains examined, we identified the G type in 131 (90.3%) and the P type in 127 (87.5%) of the samples. An overall predominance of genotypes P[8] G1 (42.7%) and P[8] G4 (32.4%) was found during the period of study, with much lower incidence of genotypes P[4] G2 (5.5%) and P[8] G3 (2%). P[6] and P[9] types were not detected, neither were unusual combinations of P and G types. A significant genotypic shift was observed: whereas P[8] G4 was the most prevalent genotype during the first year of the study (60%), the genotype P[8] G1 gradually increased to account for 62.3% of the strains analysed in the following winter season. Mixed G types revealing dual infections G1/G4 and G3/G4 were found at low frequency (2%).

Genotypes Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) Rotavirus VP4 VP7 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Buesa
    • 1
  • C.O. de Souza
    • 1
  • M. Asensi
    • 2
  • C. Martínez
    • 2
  • J. Prat
    • 3
  • M.T. Gil
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, Hospital Clínico Universitario, School of MedicineUniversity of ValenciaValenciaSpain
  2. 2.Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Clínico Universitario, School of MedicineUniversity of ValenciaValenciaSpain
  3. 3.Laboratorio de MicrobiologíaHospital de SaguntoValenciaSpain

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