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Machine Learning

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 5–23 | Cite as

An Experimental Evaluation of Integrating Machine Learning with Knowledge Acquisition

  • Geoffrey I. Webb
  • Jason Wells
  • Zijian Zheng
Article

Abstract

Machine learning and knowledge acquisition from experts have distinct capabilities that appear to complement one another. We report a study that demonstrates the integration of these approaches can both improve the accuracy of the developed knowledge base and reduce development time. In addition, we found that users expected the expert systems created through the integrated approach to have higher accuracy than those created without machine learning and rated the integrated approach less difficult to use. They also provided favorable evaluations of both the specific integrated software, a system called The Knowledge Factory, and of the general value of machine learning for knowledge acquisition.

Integrated learning and knowledge acquisition classification learning evaluation of knowledge acquisition techniques 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoffrey I. Webb
    • 1
  • Jason Wells
    • 1
  • Zijian Zheng
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computing and MathematicsDeakin UniversityGeelongAustralia

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