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International Journal of Fracture

, Volume 91, Issue 4, pp 373–389 | Cite as

Numerical simulations of a dynamically propagating crack with a nonlinear cohesive zone

  • Francesco Costanzo
  • Jay R. Walton
Article

Abstract

Numerical solutions of a dynamic crack propagation problem are presented. Specifically, a mode III semi-infinite crack is assumed to be moving in an unbounded homogeneous linear elastic continuum while the crack tip consists of a nonlinear cohesive (or failure) zone. The numerical results are obtained via a novel semi-analytical technique based on complex variables and integral transforms. The relation between the properties of the failure zone and the resulting crack growth regime are investigated for several rate independent as well as rate dependent cohesive zone models. Based on obtained results, an hypothesis is formulated to explain the origin of the crack tip velocity periodic fluctuations that have been detected in recent dynamic crack propagation experiments.

Keywords

Fracture Criterion Cohesive Zone Cohesive Force Cohesive Zone Model Dynamic Crack Propagation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesco Costanzo
    • 1
  • Jay R. Walton
    • 2
  1. 1.Engineering Science and Mechanics DepartmentThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA.
  2. 2.Department of MathematicsTexas A&M University, %College StationUSA.

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