European Journal of Epidemiology

, Volume 13, Issue 8, pp 875–879

Hepatitis A infection: A seroepidemiological study in young adults in North-East Italy

  • M.E. Moschen
  • A. Floreani
  • E. Zamparo
  • V. Baldo
  • S. Majori
  • V. Gasparini
  • R. Trivello
Article

Abstract

During the period from January to May 1994, the prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis A virus infection (anti-HAV) was tested by immunoenzyme assay in the serum samples of 620 apparently healthy subjects (81% males, 19% females), from 10 to 29 years old, resident in North-East Italy (Pordenone and surrounding district). The overall prevalence of anti-HAV was 3.7%. There was a significant lower prevalence in the group aged 10-19 than in the one aged 20–29 years (0.7% vs 6%; p < 0.001). Moreover, a significant sex difference was observed for the 20–29 year age group (p < 0.001). Among the various risk factors considered, family size and travelling abroad to endemic areas were significantly associated with HAV infection. Since a valid and effective vaccine against HAV infection has recently become available, anti-HAV vaccination campaigns can feasibly be programmed. However, different geographical regions present different epidemiological situations, so its use should be adapted to each region, with special attention to the cost-effectiveness of the immunisation programme. Our data suggest that in our region such vaccination could initially be proposed to high-risk subjects such as those travelling to endemic areas.

Epidemiology Hepatitis A North-East Italy Seroprevalence 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • M.E. Moschen
    • 1
  • A. Floreani
    • 2
  • E. Zamparo
    • 3
  • V. Baldo
    • 1
  • S. Majori
    • 4
  • V. Gasparini
    • 5
  • R. Trivello
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of HygieneUniversity of PaduaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Internal MedicineUniversity of PaduaItaly
  3. 3.Local Health UnitPublic Health ServiceItaly
  4. 4.Institute of HygieneUniversity of VeronaItaly
  5. 5.HygieneUniversity of UdineItaly

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