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Environmental Biology of Fishes

, Volume 52, Issue 1–3, pp 261–269 | Cite as

Reproductive success in female Neolamprologus mondabu (Cichlidae): influence of substrate types

  • Yasuhiro Takemon
  • Katsuyuki Nakanishi
Article

Abstract

Individual variation in body size, home range size, and reproductive success among Neolamprologus mondabu (Cichlidae) females were investigated with reference to substrate types in the littoral zone of northern Lake Tanganyika. Larger females occupied sandy substrates and smaller ones stony substrates. Female reproductive success, estimated as the number of offspring successfully released per month, was higher on sandy substrates than on stony substrates. This may be attributable to higher spawning intensity and better protection of broods against predators in open, sandy habitats.

substrate brooder body size home range size habitat preference Lake Tanganyika fish 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuhiro Takemon
    • 1
  • Katsuyuki Nakanishi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Life SciencesUniversity of Osaka PrefectureSakai, OsakaJapan
  2. 2.Ise Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Office of Mie PrefectureIse, MieJapan

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