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GeoJournal

, 49:79 | Cite as

Changes in the internal spatial structure of post-communist Prague*

  • Luděk Sýkora
Article

Abstract

The article overviews the most important changes in the internal urban structure of Prague since 1989. Post-communist urban development has been influenced by government-directed reforms of political and economic system, internationalisation and globalisation, public policies favouring unregulated market development, economic restructuring in terms of deindustrialisation and growth of producer services, and increasing social differentiation. The three most transparent processes of urban change in Prague have been (1) commercialisation of the historical core; (2) revitalisation of some inner city neighbourhoods; and (3) residential and commercial suburbanisation in the outer city.

commercialisation gentrification internal urban structure post-socialist city suburbanisation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luděk Sýkora
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Social Geography and Regional DevelopmentCharles UniversityPraguefcThe Czech Republic

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